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Community Associations: Preferred Places to Call Home

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For more than 10 years, community associations have consistently remained preferred places to call home. The majority (90%) of survey respondents say their association's rules protect and enhance their property values (62%) or have a neutral effect (28%). Eighty-four percent of those surveyed expressed that neighbors elected to the governing board “absolutely" or “for the most part" serve the best interests of their communities. This was cited through the 2018 Homeowner Satisfaction Survey, conducted by Zogby Analytics for the Foundation for Community Association Research (FCAR)​.
Community association residents in the data sample commented on other association benefits:

  • HOAsweetHOA_WEB_full.jpgNearly 73 percent of residents said their community managers provide value and support to residents and their associations.
  • Most common monthly assessments are in the $100–$300 range, with condominium assessments slightly higher than homeowners association fees (17 percent are more than $500 per month).
  • In addition, more than half of respondents nationwide (54%) feel they are paying just the right amount in assessments.
  • Two-thirds of surveyed homeowners and condominium association owners have, at some point, attended their community association board meetings—with the majority attending four board meetings per year.
  • More than 60 percent of respondents believe that associations should insist that all homeowners pay their assessments, and attorneys should be involved, if necessary, when homeowners are delinquent in paying their assessments.


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>>Download the full report here​
>>Read the press release here
>>Access 2016 Findings here

The 2016 Homeowner Satisfaction Survey, national research conducted by Zogby Analytics for the Foundation for Community Association Research (FCAR), supports similar findings from past surveys in 2005, 2007, 2009, 2012, and 2014.​

 

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